Uber changes policies for claims of sexual harassment, assault

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The new policy will give victims of sexual violence, including riders, drivers and employees, the option of choosing how they want to approach a sexual harassment or assault claim.

Arbitration clauses have played a role in high-profile settlements involving film mogul Harvey Weinstein and others, enabling accusations and settlements to be made in secret.

There is no openly offered information for the variety of sexual assaults by Uber chauffeurs or motorists of other rideshare business. the reporter's analysis originated from a thorough evaluation of authorities reports, federal court records and county court databases for 20 significant United States cities.

"So moving forward, survivors will be free to choose to resolve their individual claims in the venue they prefer: in mediation.in arbitration. or in open court".

Uber will also no longer require any survivors to sign nondisclosure agreements if they wish to speak out about their claims.

The company's change in how it handles these matters reflects a deliberate corporate decision to contribute toward a more outspoken, open culture of speaking out against sexual abuse and end what has always been a culture of corporate silence around such matters across industries. "Data transparency is only meaningful if we describe and categorize sexual assault incidents in the same way". In April, a CNN investigation identified more than 100 Uber drivers accused of sexually assaulting or abusing passengers in the past four years.

Assault and harassment cases are now exempt from that requirement. The changes are being announced amid concerns that Uber hasn't done enough to protect its riders.

"I do expect these numbers to be numbers that people will be rightly upset by and will rightly be able to take concrete action against", said Uber's West, a former top Justice Department official.

The news came one day ahead of a court-mandated due date for Uber to react in a proposed class action suit submitted by law practice Wigdor LLP on behalf of 9 females implicating motorists of sexual assault.

The move by Uber raises two questions: How far does this change in policy go toward repairing Uber's reputation, and what does this mean for other companies with arbitration clauses? She said this is the "beginning of a longer process needed to meaningfully improve safety".

Uber says it has met with more than 80 women's groups and recruited several prominent advocates as advisers on these issues.

Indeed, Tuesday's change seems tied to a larger, concerted campaign by Dara Khosrowshahi to at least superficially reform the historically troubled company. While it's easy to pick on individual companies like Uber for having policies like this, the truth is that they're just doing what all companies do.

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