President Trump opioid plan includes death penalty for drug traffickers

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"We will not incarcerate or execute our way out of the opioid epidemic", Democratic senator Ed Markey said last week.

He outlined the capital punishment plan during a speech in Manchester, New Hampshire, a state hard hit by the opioid crisis.

President Trump's plan to directly attack the opioid epidemic will likely be reviewed and changed before it is fully applied.

During his bid for the GOP presidential nomination, Trump was boosted by his victory in New Hampshire first-in-the-nation primary.

The president told the audience at a Pennsylvania campaign rally this month that countries like Singapore have fewer issues with drug addiction because they harshly punish their dealers.

"If you shoot one person, they give you life, they give you the death penalty".

"It's the least expensive thing we can do, where you scare them from ending up like the people in the commercials". Conservative commentator and former White House speechwriter Pat Buchanan went up against George H.W. Bush, claiming the "old conservative movement is breaking apart."

But instead the US Justice Department will call for the death penalty for drug traffickers under existing federal laws. If we don't get tough on these dealers, we are not going to win this battle.

I understand that the United States Government or, upon completion of the term (s) of Mr. Donald J. Trump, an authorized representative of Mr. Trump, may seek any remedy available to enforce this Agreement including, but not limited to, application for a court order prohibiting disclosure of information in breach of this Agreement.

Federal law now allows for the death penalty in drug cases that involve murder, such as those committed during a drive-by shooting or while trafficking drugs, according to the Death Penalty Information Center.

"Eventually the Democrats will agree with us and will build the wall to keep the damn drugs out", Trump fired.

It is not clear if the death penalty, even for traffickers whose product causes multiple deaths, would be constitutional. "We really need some action".

The plan seeks to cut the number of opioid prescriptions filled by a third within three years, a restriction that will face opposition from critics who argue it could have unintended consequences for people with chronic and even acute pain, and that it instead could force some users to seek more unsafe drugs, like heroin and synthetic fentanyl.

Brian Nolen, a contractor from Bedford, waits at the corner of Chestnut and Massabesic streets Monday with a sign he made mocking President Donald Trump. In late October, the administration declared the opioid epidemic a national public health emergency, a move it extended another 90 days in mid-January. "It is no longer somebody else's community, somebody else's kid, somebody else's co-worker".

The plan also calls for prevention, with a goal of reducing the number of opioid prescriptions by one-third over the next three years.

Monday marked the first time Trump and the first lady have traveled to New Hampshire since attending a rally at the SNHU Arena on November 7, 2016, the night before the general election.

Trump's plan directs his Justice Department to prosecute doctors, pharmacies and opioid manufacturers that break the law and calls for increased research and development through public-private partnerships with other manufacturers of the drugs.

Last month New Hampshire Sens.

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