One cigarette is enough to make you an addict, says study

Share

Of the responses, just over 60 percent had ever tried a cigarette, and among those, nearly 69 percent reported that they had gone on to become daily smokers.

The team analysed data from the United Kingdom, the US, New Zealand, Australia and Canada.

A recent analysis of survey answers shows that more than two thirds of people from English speaking, developed countries went on to become daily smokers if they had ever tried a cigarette.

Researchers from Queen Mary University, London, analyzed the results of eight surveys on smoking habits in English-speaking countries and found that a single cigarette is enough to spark a daily smoking habit - at least temporarily - in 69 percent of people.

"We've found that the conversion rate from "first time smoker" to "daily smoker" is surprisingly high, which helps confirm the importance of preventing cigarette experimentation in the first place", said lead researcher Professor Peter Hajek from Queen Mary University.

Given the high conversion rate found in all existing surveys, the researchers suggest that at least some of the reduction in smoking prevalence observed over the past 20 years is likely due to reduced experimentation with cigarettes among adolescents.

However, Professor Hajek but refutes a link between daily smoking and vaping.

'It is striking that very few non-smokers who try e-cigarettes become daily vapers, while such a large proportion of non-smokers who try conventional cigarettes become daily smokers.

The study was concentrated on revealing just how addictive smoking can be, and how it can turn into a habit even for those people who only smoke occasionally or just once. During the same period, 19.3% of 18-to-24-year-olds used to smoke compared to 25.8% in 2010.

Deborah Arnott, chief executive of the nonprofit Action on Smoking and Health, said the research "highlights the risks children run of entering into a life of addiction when they experiment with smoking".

It's not just the people in the United Kingdom who are taking a positive step towards leading a cigarette-free healthy life, but the name synonymous with tobacco since the 19 century - Phillip Morris - is also taking a step towards quitting selling cigarettes. But while on one side public and retailers are supporting the introduction of licensing for tobacco, on the other side the government refusing to introduce this. But, he noted, the influence of e-cigarettes should also be explored, since the decline in smoking rates in England has accelerated since the devices came onto the market.

Share