Independents not on board with GOP tax plan

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Almost half of American women say they've been sexually assaulted, according to a new Quinnipiac University poll released Wednesday.

Fifty-three percent of American voters are rejecting the tax plan while 29 percent approve, the independent Quinnipiac University Poll finds.

Almost two-thirds of voters, meanwhile, said they believe the wealthy will be the biggest beneficiaries of the GOP tax plan, compared to about a quarter who said they think middle class Americans will see the largest benefit.

Seventy percent of Americans believe that Congress should investigate President Trump for sexual harassment, according to a Quinnipiac poll released Wednesday.

Trump told reporters Tuesday that he views the tax plan as a "tremendous bill for jobs and for the middle class".

However, the big difference between the two efforts is that far fewer Americans opposed the 1986 tax bill than oppose the proposals being debated today, 34 percent vs. 56 percent, respectively, Gallup says.

In Dec. 2013, 47 percent of respondents to the poll said they preferred Republicans to win control of the U.S. House and Senate, compared to 42 percent who preferred Democratic majorities.

Notably, Democrats have been following the news about congressional debate over the tax bill more closely than other party groups have, according to Gallups polling.

Forty-one percent of voters said they expect their taxes to go up under the GOP plan, 32 percent said they think it would not have much impact and 20 percent said they think it would reduce their taxes.

In fact, the Republican tax cuts are even more unpopular than tax hikes passed under presidents Clinton and George H.W. Bush.

The poll was conducted between November 29 and December 4 and included phone interviews with 1,508 voters with a margin of error of 3.1 percent. Thirty-nine percent of Democrats report following the topic very closely - well above the 28 percent of Republicans and 25 percent of independents. The margin of error of is 3.1 percentage points.

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