Coffee drinking 'more likely to improve health than harm it'

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For many of us coffee is literally the elixir of life.

People who drink three to four cups of coffee a day could benefit from the beverage.

The "umbrella review" examined 201 studies based on observational research and 17 studies based on clinical trials.

While overall it may be beneficial, some people may be at higher risk of adverse effects, he said, and there is "substantial uncertainty" about the effects of higher levels of intake. Drinking above that number in the same period didn't appear to show any harm, although the benefits were less apparent.

"Umbrella reviews" synthesise previous pooled analyses to give a clearer summary of diverse research on a particular topic.

The discoveries move down other late surveys and investigations of coffee drinking in this way, general, his message on coffee was consoling. And - get this - the optimum amount is three or four cups a day.

Coffee consumption was consistently associated with a lower risk of Parkinson's disease, even after adjustment for smoking, and across all categories of exposure.

Moderate coffee drinking is protected, and three to four mugs a day may have some medical advantages, as indicated by an expansive audit of past examinations, in the BMJ.

The study collected evidences through more than 200 earlier researches and found that consuming coffee also linked to lesser risk of dementia, liver disease, diabetes and a few cancers. Coffee consumption was also consistently associated with significantly lower risk of gallstone disease and consistently associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes for high versus low consumption. The greatest benefit was seen for liver conditions, such as cirrhosis of the liver.

Reassuringly, harms were not apparent apart from during pregnancy when coffee drinking was linked to low birth weight, premature birth (in the first six months of pregnancy) and miscarriage. This is not new knowledge, and there are guidelines for limiting caffeine intake in pregnancy. As a drink coffee was unknown before the 15th century.

However, it's worth noting that drinking a lot of coffee can also be detrimental to your health. It's not about sugar, syrups, biscuits, cakes and pastries. 'It can't be good for you to drink so much coffee, can it?' Read the original article.

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