NYC Subway Train Derails, Some Passengers Hurt

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One train line is still suspended and several others are running on modified routes through much of the system as the agency works to fix the tracks at the site of the derailment at 125th Street and St. Nicholas. Earlier today, an A train derailed in Harlem, causing significant delays; passengers had to climb from the auto and exit through the subway tunnel. Passenger Skip Suva told us, "We were between 135th and 125th and. the train started shaking insanely violently, the lights started flickering".

The New York Times reported that 34 people were injured in the derailment with 17 transported to hospitals for minor injuries. Lhota said the smoke was caused by sparks and the garbage and sanitation along the tracks.

Dozens of riders were injured in Harlem Tuesday when a subway train derailed and careened into a wall, authorities said.

"It's a serious derailment, with quite of bit of damage to signals and some structural damage to the walls", TWU Local 100 Vice President for the Maintenance of Wayn Division Tony Utano said in a statement.

The MTA said it is investigating the incident and what triggered the emergency brakes to activate as they do not know yet whether it was a person pulling them or if they went off on their own. "People were falling", said passenger Susan Pak, of Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey.

Emergency personnel have responded to a Manhattan subway station where passengers were reporting smoke and a loss of power.

The No. 1 train prepares to leave the South Ferry Station, Tuesday June 27, 2017, in NY.

The train derailed as the MTA was preparing to celebrate the reopening of a subway station at the southern tip of Manhattan that had been closed since it was flooded by Superstorm Sandy in October 2012.

About 800 passengers were stuck in the rest of the train and three other trains after the crash caused a power outage. Every day, we're treated to a new stream of cell-phone photos and videos broadcasting subway crises on social media in real time.

The panic was caused by the smoke which filled the tunnel. Joseph Lhota, who Cuomo appointed as MTA chairman last Wednesday, was on the scene. A report released earlier this month found that rush-hour cancellations and delays on the railroad are at the highest level in ten years.

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