Trump acknowledges he is under investigation in Russian Federation probe

Share

U.S. Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein has privately acknowledged he may need to recuse himself from matters relating to the Russian Federation probe, given that he could become a potential witness in the investigation, ABC News reported on Friday, citing unnamed sources.

Trump advisers describe the president as increasingly angry over the investigation, yelling at television sets carrying coverage and insisting he is the target of a conspiracy.

Rosenstein told the Associated Press earlier this month that when he hired Mueller he discussed the possibility of having recuse himself "if anything that I did winds up being relevant to his investigation" and if recusal is necessary.

The Washington Post reported late Wednesday that special counsel Robert Mueller is seeking interviews with three Trump administration officials who weren't involved in Trump's campaign.

The president has denied that he has any nefarious ties to Russian Federation and has also disputed that he's attempted to block the investigation into his campaign's possible role in Russia's election-related hacking. The New York Times also reported the story.

Tensions are building inside the Justice Department as Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein contemplates whether he will become a witness in the ongoing investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 USA elections.

Sen. Dianne Feinstein, the top Democrat on the Senate Judiciary Committee, said she was "increasingly concerned" that Trump will fire both Mueller and Rosenstein. The official demanded anonymity because the official was not authorized to be named discussing the deliberations.

Sen. Richard Burr, R-N.C., right, chairman of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, and Vice Chairman Mark Warner, D-Va., left, listen as Attorney General Jeff Sessions testifies before the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence about his role in the firing of FBI Director James Comey and the investigation into contacts between Trump campaign associates and Russian Federation, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, June 13, 2017. An official of Trump's transition confirmed the lawyer's internal order, which was sent Thursday.

Deputy attorney general Rod Rosenstein submitted a widely circulated memo to the president last month raising concerns over Mr Comey's performance, but Mr Trump later said he had already made the decision to fire Mr Comey. The White House used the memo to justify Comey's firing.

He also has millions of followers on his official Facebook pages. (See video.) Colbert was referring to Trump telling Holt that he was thinking about "this Russian Federation thing" when he fired Comey. The transition, a nonprofit structurally separate from the Trump campaign, continues to operate with a small staff.

The White House has directed questions to outside legal counsel, which has not responded. Trump said last week he felt vindicated by Comey's June 8 testimony that he was not the subject of investigation while Comey headed the agency.

The memo from the transition's general counsel directs all staffers and volunteers who worked on the Trump transition to "preserve any written documents.as well as any electronic information" related to Russia, Ukraine and any foreign travel by Trump transition members.

Trump's personal lawyer, Michael Cohen, also has retained an attorney to represent him.

Share