NBC vows to air interview with Sandy Hook-denier Jones

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Jones, a conspiracy theorist who dubbed the unaired interview as "fake news", has been releasing secretly recording recordings with Kelly.

Alex Jones, the conspiracy theorist and founder of the far-right Infowars media operation, has posted excerpts of his pre-interview calls with NBC News's Megyn Kelly in which she appears to promise that she will go easy on him in their upcoming television interview.

The scheduled interview between Megyn and Alex is scheduled to air on Father's Day, on Sunday, June 18. In the preview clips of the segment that have been released, Kelly asks Jones about the Sandy Hook conspiracy theory.

NBC News responded to The Hill's comment request on Friday, stating it remained committed to airing the interview. Meanwhile, parents of children killed in the 2012 Sandy Hook school massacre have urged NBC not to give him airtime because he's theorized the shooting could be a hoax.

"Airing Ms. Kelly's interview implicitly endorses the notion that Mr. Jones" lies are actually "claims' that are worthy of serious debate, and in doing so it exponentially enhances the suffering and distress of our clients", lawyers Josh Koskoff and Katie Mesner-Hage wrote. The families told NBC that the interview is likely to cause devastating human consequences.

Earlier in the week, a group founded by the parents of Sandy Hook Elementary School victims has dropped Kelly as an event host due to the interview.

Kelly says she believes there's value in exposing what Jones says to the American people.

The station's general manager and president, in a memo seen by Reuters, told employees the wounds of the shooting are "understandably still so raw" and the station has "decided not to air this week's episode of Sunday Night With Megyn Kelly". "My goal is for your listeners and the left, you know, who will be watching some on NBC, to say, 'Wow, that's really interesting", she says on one of the recordings, which were edited by Jones.

Kelly joined NBC News in January after 13 years at Fox News for a reported $17 million per year.

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