Bill Cosby's Sexual Assault Trial Declared a Mistrial, Following Jury Deadlock

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A United States judge has declared a mistrial in the sexual assault trial of celebrity comedian Bill Cosby after jurors could not reach a unanimous decision about Cosby's guilt.

Yes, Allison admitted, she thought the testimony given over six days was a road map pointing the jurors toward one conclusion: guilty on all counts.

The jurors clearly struggled with their verdict, telling the judge on Thursday they were at impasse. Constand, who is gay, said their contact was not consensual. To date, over fifty women have made sexual assault allegations against Cosby, but the statute of limitations means that he has only been tried for Constand's.

According to the released trial testimony, Cosby confirmed giving Constand Quaaludes three banned sedative pills, referring to them while under oath as "three friends".

Bill Cosby's sexual assault trial ended in a mistrial today (June 17).

After it was declared a mistrial, prosecutors said they will retry Cosby's case, NPR reports.

Constand "has shown such courage through this, and we are in awe of what she has done", Steele said.

"I have no authority to do this", Judge Steven O'Neill said in the 52nd hour of deliberations Friday night.

Cosby himself didn't comment.

Then she walked out onto the courthouse plaza, where Cosby's publicist had just read a fiery statement from the comedian's wife and where a small ragtag band of protesters were marching around yelling, "We love Bill". Defense Attorney, Brian McMonagle also made a statement saying that Cosby became the focus of these accusations because he was an easy target for the woman who thought they could get money out of him.

The mistrial was a blow to the dozens of women who have said they were sexually assaulted by Cosby. And attorney Gloria Allred, who's been an organizer for numerous women accusing Cosby of assault, made it clear that charges, either legal or civil, against the comedian are likely to continue. At the time, she was a 30-year-old employee of Temple University, while Cosby, 66, was a trustee. Constand alleges that Cosby incapacitated her with blue pills and then molested her while she drifted in and out of consciousness.

A conviction could send Cosby to prison for the rest of his life, but the case has already helped demolish Cosby's nice-guy image, cultivated during his eight-year run as Dr. Cliff Huxtable on "The Cosby Show", the top-rated 1980s and '90s sitcom. As it stands right now, the prosecution has stated that they have a year to retry the case, but that they would like to push things forward sooner.

As reported by CNN, Cosby's aggravated indecent assault case culminated in a mistrial decision on Saturday.

Before going on trial, Cosby expressed hope he could eventually resume his career.

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