Trump being probed for possible obstruction of justice

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Special counsel Robert Mueller met on Capitol Hill with the leaders of the Senate intelligence committee Wednesday afternoon, a long-awaited connection as lawmakers and federal investigators plot a path forward on the investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election. Investigators are also considering the conversations Comey and the president had leading up to that point.

Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats and National Security Agency Director Mike Rogers have agreed to be interviewed by Mueller's team as part of the investigation. Grassley said Comey's dismissal and Comey's testimony on Lynch should be looked at together, noting that Comey "took the opportunity in his testimony to clear his own name by denouncing as false the administration's claims that the FBI rank-and-file had lost confidence in Mr. Comey's leadership in the wake of the Clinton email investigation".

"The FBI leak of information regarding the president is outrageous, inexcusable and illegal", Mark Corallo told the Post.

Several legal experts said that Mr Comey's testimony, about Mr Trump telling him he expected loyalty and hoped he could drop an investigation of a former top aide, could bolster obstruction of justice allegations against the President.

"While the president has the right to, he has no intention to do so", Sarah Sanders, a White House spokesman said.

A spokesman for Mueller's team declined to comment.

The news came the same week as Trump friend Chris Ruddy floated the possibility that Trump would fire Mueller, who was appointed to head up the investigation after Trump fired Comey.

Justice Department policy is that a sitting president can not be indicted by a grand jury, the Post also reported Wednesday.

Former FBI Director James Comey is sworn in during a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on Capitol Hill, Thursday, June 8, 2017, in Washington.

"The investigation is examining possible contacts with Russian operatives as well as any suspicious financial activity related to those individuals", the daily said.

The fired Federal Bureau of Investigation director said ultimately it was up to Mueller to make a determination whether the president crossed a legal line. But that changed shortly after Trump fired Comey last May, the Post's sources said.

Chatter surfaced earlier this week that the president was considering firing Mueller. "I know I was sacked because of something about the way I was conducting the Russian Federation investigation was in some way putting pressure on him, in some way irritating him, and he made a decision to fire me because of that", he said.

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