Michigan officials charged in Flint Legionnaires' outbreak

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Nick Lyon, the head of Michigan's health department, has been charged with involuntary manslaughter in connection to the Flint water crisis.

Six officials were charged in all - five with involuntary manslaughter - according to Michigan Attorney General Bill Schutte.

Chip Chamberlain and Larry Willey are representing Lyon and called the charges "baseless".

During the course of the investigation of the Flint Water Crisis, it is alleged that Wells attempted to withhold funding for programs created to help the victims of the crisis, and then lied to an investigator about material facts related to the investigation. While Lyon is not the first or the only person to be charged because of the water crisis, he is the person most directly responsible for the deaths of 12 people and the lead poisoning of Flint's children. Legionnaires' is a type of bacterial pneumonia that experts have linked to contaminated water.

The Director of the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services will be charged with involuntary manslaughter in the Flint Water Crisis. It was about the increased surveillance of the Legionnaires' Disease outbreak since they hadn't figured out the source of the outbreak.

"Director Lyon and Dr. Wells have been and continue to be instrumental in Flint's recovery", he said in a statement.

At a news conference, Attorney General Bill Schuette told reporters the announcement is about restoring accountability and trust. "They have my full faith and confidence, and will remain on duty at DHHS", according to Detroit Free Press.

Residents began drinking bottled water in 2016. State officials failed to require the addition of corrosion inhibitors to the water, and, as a result, lead leached from pipes into the city's drinking water. "A threat that cost of the life of Robert Skidmore".

Lyon has admitted that he was aware of the Legionnaires' outbreak for months but wanted to wait until investigators in the state Health and Human Services Department finished their own probe.

January 5, 2016: Snyder declares a state of emergency in Flint, the same day federal officials confirm that they are investigating.

Lyon, 49, of Marshall, Mich., is accused of causing the death of Robert Skidmore on December 13, 2015, by failing to alert the public about a foreseeable outbreak of Legionnaires' disease. The investigation, he said, "wasn't one that was easily solved". After Kilgore told Lyon that decision could cause more people to die, Lyon allegedly responded that he "couldn't save everyone", and "they have to die of something", the report said.

More than a dozen people now have been charged in the case, and pre-trial hearings and other legal proceedings are occurring; Schuette also released the initial results of the more than yearlong investigation, including a review of the facts and evidence in the case.

In 2014, Flint began pumping water from the Flint River into the homes of Flint's almost 100,000 residents.

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